October 19, 2014
The Mathematical Shape of Things to Come

Jennifer Ouellette:

Simon DeDeo, a research fellow in applied mathematics and complex systems at the Santa Fe Institute, had a problem. He was collaborating on a new project analyzing 300 years’ worth of data from the archives of London’s Old Bailey, the central criminal court of England and Wales. Granted, there was clean data in the usual straightforward Excel spreadsheet format, including such variables as indictment, verdict, and sentence for each case. But there were also full court transcripts, containing some 10 million words recorded during just under 200,000 trials.

[source: mme rss]

October 19, 2014
Martin Gardner and Mr Hyde

Burkard Polster and Marty Ross:

"Why can’t you be more like Martin Gardner?" So has been the refrain from some of your Maths Masters’ disgruntled readers. Well, the answer is pretty simple: we’re not as smart as Martin Gardner, we can’t write nearly as well as him and our limited talents haven’t been honed by fifty years of practice. The request is as wildly optimistic as our wives’ plea that we be more like George Clooney.

George Clooney?! Oh right, he’s that actor that married internationally acclaimed barrister Amal Alamuddin (if interested, here’s the link).

[source: mme rss]

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October 19, 2014
At 100 Years Old, Brooklyn Math Teacher Continues To Shape Young Minds

CBSNewYork:

 Age is nothing but a number for one Brooklyn math teacher [Madeline Scotto] who is still shaping young minds and inspiring others after celebrating her 100th birthday.

[source: mme rss]

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October 17, 2014
Bum grades: flunking UWE Bristol student has maths equation tattooed on bottom in bid to pass exams

The Bristol Post:

He vowed to get a quadratic equation permanently inked onto his backside if he failed to achieve at least a B grade in his re-takes.

[source: mme rss]

October 17, 2014
Let’s do some math on Ebola before we start quarantining people

Justin D. Martin:

The magnitude of false positives for medical tests—a positive test for a condition that a patient does not actually have—is something that is not well understood, even by members of the medical community. We should remember this, as the United States prepares to lock away potential scores of individuals who test positive for Ebola. Many observers do not realize just how many people may spend some time in quarantine when they do not have the dreaded disease.

[source: mme rss]

October 15, 2014
TSN Radio explores advanced stats with TSN Hockey Analytics show

TSN.ca Staff:

TSN is debuting TSN Hockey Analytics, a new TSN Radio show dedicated to the exploration of advanced stats in hockey. The weekly show merges the worlds of ‘traditional’ hockey coverage and hockey analytics in order to provide a 360-degree view of teams, players, and storylines from around the league.

[source: ‘That’s Hockey’ on TSN]

October 15, 2014
The King Of Calculus: Turning online education on its head

George Anders:

Two years ago, when the online education craze began, big-name professors started cranking out videos about hot topics such as cryptography or startup engineering. Left in the dust was the old-fashioned mathematics class that no one wanted to teach online: Calculus.

[source: mme rss]

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October 15, 2014
This Math Model Is Predicting the Ebola Outbreak with Incredible Accuracy

Michael Byrne:

Part of the allure of epidemiology is being able to describe and predict highly dynamic outbreaks with simple, clean mathematical models. But how close can models really get to perfectly mapping the spread of disease? 

[source: @MathUpdate’s Twitter feed]

October 14, 2014
How to raise our PISA scores

Ted Lewis:

A rather facetious list of recommendations based on what some of the participants have done or are doing.

[source: mme rss]

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October 13, 2014
Candy Crush's Puzzling Mathematics

Toby Walsh:

A big part of the appeal of Candy Crush for players is that there are complex underpinnings to the seemingly simple puzzle. Surprisingly, the game holds a lot of interest for researchers as well: It offers insight into one of the most important open problems in mathematics, as well as into the security of computer systems.

[source: mme rss]

October 13, 2014
Martin Gardner: The Three-Card Swindle

Gary Antonick:

Martin Gardner was a towering figure in recreational mathematics, skepticism and magic, and did more than anyone to popularize the kinds of puzzles we feature each week in Numberplay. Mr. Gardner would have been 100 years old this coming Oct. 21 (he died in 2010), and we’ll be celebrating his interests and influence with a special series of posts.

[source: mme rss]

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October 11, 2014
Why you need to be a maths genius to post a parcel

Brian Milligan:

If you are planning to post a present this Christmas, it is advisable to be good at maths, or at least go shopping with a tape measure and a pair of weighing scales.

[source: mme rss]

October 10, 2014
On Deck: A Sabermetric Broadcast

Neil Paine:

Although sabermetrics has substantially reshaped baseball’s on-field product over the past few decades, its progress in the broadcast booth has been slower. It’s not hard to see why the two trends haven’t moved in lockstep: While teams adopted the analytics model out of the need to win games, the same market pressures didn’t apply to commentators. For teams, integrating sabermetrics meant they were more likely to win; for commentators, it meant they were more likely to confuse. But now a younger generation is steeped in analytics, and statistically minded fans obsessively check sites such as Fangraphs, Baseball-Reference and Brooks Baseball to get what broadcasts and talk radio aren’t providing.

[source: mme rss]

October 10, 2014
Can you teach an old parent new math? (And why would you?)

Eliana Osborn:

Quadratic equation? I remember this. First, outside, inside, last for multiplying. Graphing? Rise over run. Quickly I ran into a problem: the thimble full of algebra skills in my head only stacked up to about 20 percent of the program. There are all kinds of things I don’t think even existed in 1994. Negative exponents? Parabolas? Clearly people have been inventing new math stuff while I wasn’t looking.

[source: mme rss]

October 10, 2014
Who Needs Algebra? New Approach To College Math Helps More Pass

Elissa Nadworny and Anya Kamenetz:

Let’s start with a little word problem. Sixty percent of the nation’s 12.8 million community college students are required to take at least one course in subject X. Eighty percent of that 60 percent never move on past that requirement.

[source: mme rss]

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